It was 12:45 a.m. and I was in the venue's back office trying to wrestle my mildly claustrophobic boyfriend into a mascot costume. 

I had spent almost a year pitching this idea: our surprisingly relevant Helper brand could represent the #theculture by throwing a bonafide party. No covert marketing agenda. Just good music. Dancing. And warm cheeseburger macaroni (because bias aside, I believe in my heart of hearts that Helper is the dankest late night food). 

So when the only thing standing between me and the Helper glove swag surfing with 300 millennials was a lil' oxygen, I had to make power moves.

Sorry, Zae. But you killed it!

Over 3,000 people RSVP'd to a birthday party hosted by Hamburger Helper on a Wednesday night. It was unexpected and people loved it. I wrote a whole case study about it here, but the results didn't matter to me as much as the relationships I made along the way.

The day before the party, I was elbow-to-elbow in the backseat of an Uber with four teammates I had just met. They were going back and forth about their plans for the weekend, and what gigs they had to work. Me being me, I stopped to ask what felt like a fundamental question: "Ok so...is this your main job? Like what do you do?"

Their responses had my mind racing like Bradley Cooper on that limitless pill. They produced massive events, networked with brand sponsors, and even worked a night shift to keep the bills paid. Passionate. Driven. Plotting for the future. A group of 20-somethings, on their way to execute a six-figure corporate marketing initiative. 

The tide is turning. Millennials are the nation's largest living generation and 80% of them express a desire for brands to entertain. We're in an era where a 12-year-old YouTuber has more marketing influence than a conference room of MBA's. There's a lot of power in the creative intuition of our generation. 

"Listen to the kids, bro!" Kanye West said.

There will always be "adults" to answer to and results to prove. But if you're passionate about what you do, then you're unstoppable. If you have a vision, chase after it. Pick up a night shift. Volunteer your significant other to dress up in a mascot costume. Re-write your pitch deck 14 times just to sell your big idea. 

Do whatever it takes. You are the limitless pill. And you don't need to wait on a traditional career path to take you where you want to be.

My biggest role models are my entrepreneurial peers. Niles Stewart, a 19-year-old YouTuber I met through the Helper mixtape who now writes for the award-winning FX show Atlanta. Dev Cobbs, who conceived the idea of the 40oz Bounce tour when he was just 22. Brynn Casey, who harnesses the power of Instagram to very successfully sell her ocean paintings. 

Never stop grinding. Get home from your 9-5 and clock in to your side hustle from 5-9. Push your boundaries and act boldly. Our generation is out here setting trends, making chasing dreams a lifestyle. So go for it.